Welcome Class of 2013!

Last minute preparations for the arrival of the freshman class were underway early this morning in front of Founders Hall.  Details about the incoming class are here....

Ford Fights Swine Flu Outbreak

Haverford alums showed up in all kinds of places last week, many of which were spotlighted by The New York Times and other newspapers. Dr. Richard P. Wenzel ’61, chairman of internal medicine at Virginia Commonwealth U’s medical school and former president of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, was The Times’ poster physician on August 10 for a long discussion by the paper’s medical correspondent, Lawrence Altman, M.D., of the worldwide effort to combat swine flu. Wenzel recently traveled in the US  and to Mexico and four South American countries at the invitation of former trainees now in those countries to observe cases, advise on control messages and examine data. One of Wenzel’s surprising discoveries, according to The Times: “An odd feature of the new virus is the lack of fever in a significant proportion of documented cases, even after some patients become seriously ill. In Chile, it was about half,  in Mexico City about a third, and elsewhere, less.  Lack of fever has been noted by other observers in several Canadian cases.” This is a crucial observation since “absence of fever, when fever is specified in the definition (of swine flu), can cause serious underestimation of data,” says Altman. He adds “absence of fever (also) limits the usefulness of thermal scans to identify people who have the virus and thus control the pandemic.” Read the whole story about this frontline warrior in the fight against the threatened pandemic here: Seeking Lessons in Swine Flu Fight For involvement of a well-known Haverford alumnus in a lighter sphere, check out yesterday’s Times (August 16, Metropolitan Section, p. 2). Michael...

Ford Alumns on Newspaper Survival

Don’t throw out last Sunday’s New York Times Magazine (the one with the photo of an elegant Hamid Karzai on the cover) without reading Michael Sokolove’s article “What’s a Big City Without a Newspaper?” The shock to those living near Haverford’s campus is that Sokolove uses Philadelphia as his prototype for what he sees as possible throughout the country–big cities with no daily newspapers. It’s a thorough account of the struggles of the Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News to survive. Two Haverford alumni figure prominently in Sokolove’s story–John Carroll ’63 and Paul Socolar ’77–and as it turns out, Sokolove’s comments about each of them appear in adjoining paragraphs on page 42. Carroll, former editor of major papers in Lexington (KY), Baltimore and Los Angeles and recipient of an Honorary Degree from Haverford in 2008, is described as a “lion of the traditional news movement.” Sokolove watches John “shift impatiently” in his seat at an all-day conference on the future “Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy.” John concludes that “originally reported news….the kind produced by professional reporters…who go out and dig stuff up” will still be needed in this country. A paragraph later Socolar is described as “something like the journalist of the future” because of his Philadelphia Public School Notebook, a five-time-per year in-depth publication trying to start a dialogue on public education in the city.  (Totally coincidently, The Times ran four paragraphs on this publication the day before Haverford’s web site profiled Paul. So check out the Ford web site for lots more about this creative editor.) Looks like Haverfordians will have a lot to say about...