Tuttle Summer Arts Lab 2016: “The Pool Movie”

Tuttle Summer Arts Lab 2016: “The Pool Movie”

Harlow Figa (’16), Nick Gandolfo-Lucia (’16), Marcelo Jauregui-Volpe (’18), and Sarah Moses (’16) are Tuttle Summer Arts Lab 2016 fellows. This year, the Tuttle Summer Arts Lab provides students the opportunity to work with Vicky Funari on her new feature film, the as-of-yet untitled “Pool Movie.” Fellows are collaborating with the subjects of the film to produce content for the website, research ways to make the website accessible to older people, and contribute to the intellectual climate of the project. Vicky describes the film as “a documentary film about a group of older women who find strength, grace, and community in an aquacize class at their neighborhood swimming pool. Set in a YMCA swimming pool in the suburbs of Philadelphia, this group of 60-90 year old women have spent 25 years together in the pool. The film documents the class’s final year in the old pool, as the Y prepares to close the branch and transition to a shiny, new building. Over a year in the pool, creative projects flourish, illness strikes, friendships evolve, seasons change. This is a study of older bodies and souls in water, in motion, in transition, and in community with each other.” Below, each of the fellows describes their relationship to the project and what they have been working on so far: Marcelo: I caught a quick glimpse of the poster promoting this year’s summer arts lab as I was walking around Stokes this past spring. In that glimpse I noticed the water, the people, and pool dumbbells. These faint images instantly reminded me of a project Vicky Funari mentioned to me in the...
John Muse on STRANGE TRUTH

John Muse on STRANGE TRUTH

STRANGE TRUTH is a film series at the Bryn Mawr Film Institute and Haverford College that starts this very Wednesday. The series is organized by Professors Vicky Funari (Artist in Residence), Joshua Moses (Anthropology), and John Muse (Independent College Programs). John Muse, currently teaching “Film On Photography,” took the time to answer a few questions about Wednesday’s program, featuring the work of the late Harun Farocki. 1. Are you teaching any of Farocki’s work in your classes? These very films plus essays on Farocki by Kaja Silverman and D.N. Rodowick. 2. Would you categorize these films as documentaries? Why or why not? Neither are documentaries per se.  “Images of the World…” is what’s known as an essay film.  en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essay#Film  Essay films are typically pointed, argumentative, but can also be searching and reflexive.  Or they can be personal, more like journal entries or meditations on a theme than presentations of the facts.  “Images of the World…” is more like the former, Engaging as it does with history, politics, and technologies in a reflexive mode, one that asks viewers to think about seeing and what they’re seeing.  “An Image” is stranger.  Lacking narration, a fly-on-the-wall methodology, or interviews, it’s structured more as a fiction film where the characters just happen to be real people all of whom are engaged in careful but seemingly ridiculous work.  The film reveals what the photographic image will hide: the labor required to produce it. 3. What are the connections between a film about a Playboy shoot and a film about reconnaissance of Auschwitz? Both films teach us how cameras and the technical systems within which...

Finishing My Documentary: “Chipinga”

Over the past few weeks since returning from England, I have been working around the clock to finish my documentary. I went through many stages of rough cuts—the first was 14-minutes and I was finally able to cut it down to 10-minutes with the help of suggestions from my classmates, Professor Vicky Funari, Corey Chao, friends and family. I finally finished my film this past Monday and then on Thursday—May 2—I screened my film, along with the other films made in the Advanced Documentary Video Production course. The running time for the film is 10-minutes and 23-seconds. Below is a link to the final version (for now) of Chipinga.  Watch the film here: Here is a brief description of the film: “Chipinga” is a documentary film, which details a filmmaker’s journey to wade through the multiple layers of her mother’s childhood memories and recollect memories she never had. This film illustrates what stories and images from a past life mean to three generations—a granddaughter, a mother and a grandmother—and how the past is constantly re-imagined in the present. Director’s Statement: My mother was born the 1960s in Chipinga—a small town in southern Rhodesia, which later became Zimbabwe. She grew up on a dairy farm during wartime and knew how to shoot, take apart, clean and reassemble an automatic weapon by the age of nine. As a child I idealized her memories and chose to only see the beauty and excitement in these stories. As I grew older, I heard the stories in new ways and learned about the complexity, tragedy and inequality that underlay each moment of life in...