WHAT IS Re:Humanities?

WHAT IS Re:Humanities?

If you have ever had a single question about Re:Humanities, from the most basic logistics to the most esoteric academic references, this is the blog post you’ve been waiting for. Katrina Obieta (BMC ’15), part of the Re:Hum working group, answers all. 1. What is Re:Humanities, logistically speaking? What/Who/Where/When? Re:Humanities ’15: Save, Share, Self-Destruct. will be held at Swarthmore College on April 9-10, 2015. 2. And: why? The symposium is a two-day conferences that showcases undergraduate research on digital humanities. Our goal in this symposium is to empower undergraduates with the unique opportunity to playfully engage in scholarly research, challenging them to produce and collaborate in a sphere traditionally reserved for graduates and professionals. The theme this year lies at the intersection of digital scholarship and the public realm. The tools of new media allow for innovative academic research and streamlined social contact, yet present significant trade-offs. Privacy breaches, personal digital trails, and the effects of technology in daily life remain prominent issues in public and academic circles. These concerns raise fundamental questions for both scholars and the community: What do we save? Why do we save it? What do we trade for access? How much data is too much? 3. How can students access and learn about the digital humanities in the Tri-Co beyond this conference? Re:Humanities is supported by both the Tri-Co Digital Humanities and Haverford College’s Hurford Center for the Arts and Humanities. They have many different programs and opportunities for students to learn more about digital scholarship. Learn more here: tdh.brynmawr.edu www.haverford.edu/HCAH/ 4) Feminist scholar Donna Haraway writes, “I seek my siblings in the nonarboreal, laterally communicating,...
An Interactive Flood of Spectacular Proportions

An Interactive Flood of Spectacular Proportions

Remember when God said to Noah, “be fruitful and multiply; populate the earth abundantly and multiply in it.”?  God’s probably being redundant in his phrasing because it’s such a big thing to ask of someone.  It’s not just a casual, “go ahead and populate your household, when you get around to it.”  Noah is expected to “populate the earth abundantly.”  The earth is enormous, and Noah probably thought the earth was flat and like fifty miles wide, but it’s still an intense concept to wrap your mind around. So it was, when history professor Andrew Friedman told me, “be fruitful and search for web-based digital humanities initiatives; catalog them abundantly and comment upon them.”  Not in those words exactly, though he is eloquent. My summer job is essentially to track down as many DH projects as I can, dump them all into an Excel document, and judge them mercilessly based on a rubric invented for this very task.  I annotate the Project Name, URL, and Creators of course.  Then I go on to rate each project by the following criteria: Richness of Aesthetics/Design; Usability/Navigability/Ease; FUN; Value of Information; and Theoretical Interest.  After all this, I write a small blurb of closing commentary.  I do this for hours each day, and I still haven’t cracked the surface.  It is a good job, and often a dull job. I have a secret for you.  Come closer.  I’m not supposed to say this, so I can’t be too loud.  Are you ready? Digital Humanities is mostly rubbish. I may have just offended thousands of librarians and Spanish teachers, but I stand by the...

Call for 2-Minute Presentations // SAVE AS: Lightning Talks 2

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQDDqv1tQkk&feature=youtu.be ATTN: Hackers, Designers, Luddites, Emoticon-Artists, YouTube Hooligans, Blogger Oddities, Ambient Electronic Muzak-Makers, Faculty, Students, Staff, and all manner of Digital/Non-Digital/Post-Digital Scholars In the fall of 2012 in Magill Library’s Philips Wing, 20-something students, staff, and faculty gathered together for the first SAVE AS: Lightning Talks event, each presenting digitally-minded 2-minute micro-presentations on animation in a digital world, tumblr and intellectual property rights, the help and hindrance of online religious text databases, and yes, even a brain-melting meta-lesson on how to give a good presentation in two minutes. See the full list of presentations here. Amid the hastened shouts of presenters and the polite murmuring of the packed audience, one thing was clear: We have to do this again. To that end, the SAVE AS cabal (an unholy alliance of Digital Scholarship in the Library, Instructional & Information Technology Services, the Hurford Center of the Arts & Humanities, and Tri-Co Digital Humanities) invites you to pitch a 2-minute presentation on your own digital scholarship, the germ of an idea, an app, a game, digital notation, twitter etiquette, something you’ve done, something you want to do. Share past successes or use your dwindling soapbox to source future collaborators. Essentially: Anything that uses, abuses, accepts or rejects digital technology in a way you find interesting. Intrigued? Email Coordinator for Digital Scholarship Laurie Allen at lallen@haverford.edu with a one-sentence description of your idea, and we’ll go from there. Once we reach a critical mass, we’ll announce the spring 2013 date of SAVE AS: Lightning Talks Round...