Spotted in the Hurford Center

Spotted in the Hurford Center

. . . in which we explore the hidden corners and shelves of the HCAH. (These are the things that happen on snowy spring days in Stokes 103.) Check out this shelf of books! If this bookshelf got all dressed up, it would definitely be wearing combat boots, fantastic lipstick, and some piece of clothing picked up at Philly’s Punk Rock Flea Market. I was curious as to where this bookshelf was going so decked out, so I did some digging in the HCAH archives and found this student seminar: Man, it’s times like these I wish I had a time machine. (Okay okay, before you call me super lame for using my time machine to go back to 2006, are there reeaally that many times you’d travel back to as a mixed race woman? Besides, who wouldn’t wanna go back to a time when “Fergalicious” was playing on every ipod nano?) This student seminar studied the works of African American, Chicana, Native American, East and South Asian American, and Middle Eastern women to learn about identity politics and the contributions of women of color in Second Wave feminism. They read many of the books on our bookshelf-in-question. **Excuse me while I update my Amazon wish list. . . Stay tuned for the announcement of next year’s student...
Throwback Thursday 10

Throwback Thursday 10

Whazzup, peeps? Back this week with a Student Seminar. Lucky for you, the HCAH has just released next fall’s student seminars, so read on and think about how awesome your fall could be.   Lewis Bauer (’06 English) led the seminar, “The Bizarre and the Grotesque in Literature, Art, and Film: Honest Looks at a Mad World,” to explore our cultural idealization of normality and the repercussions of deviation. Participants discussed not only the impact of the bizarre and grotesque on the arts, but also on society. Questions of cultural relativism recurred throughout the seminar. James Weissinger (’06 English), participated in the seminar and reflects: “Taussig, Ballard, Foucault, Bakhtin, Kassler-Taub–the seminar introduced me to a few folks who would end up becoming familiar friends for the rest of school and after. One of my most important experiences at Haverford.”  To sum up the fantastic ride that was the seminar, James points to this bizarre music video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFsHSHE-iJQ. If you’re interested in cross-disciplinary discussions with new friends while munching on free refreshments and reading free books, apply to one of the upcoming seminars: “Decoding the Videogame: Reading and Writing in New Media,” or “Beyond the Reals: An Exploration of Mathematics in Fiction.” More information: http://www.haverford.edu/HCAH/center/programs_and_grants/student_seminars.php (sorry this hyperlink didn’t hyperlink, back to the good ol’ days of copy and paste it is). Hope to see lots of applications this year! Until next time, Anna and Miriam    ...

Throwback Thursday 6

Hello again! We’re back with this semester’s series of Throwback Thursdays.   This week, we’re talking about a student seminar called “Mining the Folktale,” led by Justin Dainer-Best ’09 (English, Psychology). The seminar delved into questions such as what constitutes a folktale and what purpose they serve. Participants drew from a variety of cultures, comparing structuralist readings to Grimm’s fairytales and to the Russian Baba Yaga. The seminar produced an air of camaraderie and mutual interest among the students, according to a participant. To find out more about student seminars, follow this link: http://www.haverford.edu/HCAH/center/programs_and_grants/student_seminars.php Until next week! –Anna and...

Post-Feasting on Culture: HHC seminar and beyond

For the many Haverford students who don’t know me, my name is Isobel (’11) – I ran a HHC seminar called “Feasting on Culture: The significance of food in everyday life.” The name may be fairly self-explanatory, but in my reading list I tried to cover every way I could think of talking about food: food as art, food as identity, food and family ties, food and agriculturee policy, food and religion, food anxieties, food in literature, food as a historical agent, food and social status, the ethics of food…all I can say is I wish my group had had an infinite amount of time to talk. For the record, I wouldn’t really call myself a “foodie” – I find food socially and culturally fascinating, and I could probably talk for hours about the intricacies of a single ingredient, but being vegan (except when eating sheep’s head in Iceland…), I’m not one to coo over a bacon-wrapped oxtail or truffle mac-and-cheese or what-have-you. The point of my seminar was really go to beyond ogling food photos, as enjoyable as that can be. The seminar gave me an invaluable space to dissect issues I thought (and still think) are incredibly important on a global scale, but are frequently lost in the foodie-fication of our culture. The Food Network, food blogs, and even restaurant menus, can all be very telling social, political and economic signs. (above: I had to prove the thing about the sheep’s head…) I was lucky enough to take what I had learned with my seminar group and turn it into a Watson Fellowship; my project was studying...