QUALIA: Innovation with the E. Clyde Lutton Memorial Fund

QUALIA: Innovation with the E. Clyde Lutton Memorial Fund

This spring is looking exciting! Something to look forward to: Arielle Herman’s QUALIA, a multidisciplinary performance project happening this spring thanks to the E. Clyde Lutton Fund Memorial Fund for Performance. What does the title mean? [Laughs] I’m not 100% certain that’s what I’m calling it.  But – what Qualia means is the phenomenological quality of subjective experience: the basic example is the color red. You look at red, and other people look at red, and you think, “How do I know they’re seeing red the same way I do?” Qualia refers to the feeling of what red looks like. Red occurs pretty similarly in peoples brains, but there is no way to theoretically describe the experience. You kind of live in your own perceptual vacuum. When it comes to music and art, which are so subjective, qualia is so important. Everyone could potentially be having their own unique experience. In that sense, subjective experience, aesthetic experience, and neurological activity are all the same thing. There isn’t much overlap in the academic world between those concepts, but I think they’re really related. What’s your goal for the project? My goal is to communicate that the art and music you see and hear, the things that you feel and sense, and what happens in your brain are all related to each other.  I also want to show people that they could potentially have their own unique experience of anything, but also that your qualia of anything can overlap with other people’s. I want to communicate how incredible the brain is – I’m going to have the brainwaves projected up on the wall so people can see that the brainwaves are changing. I want it...

Throwback Thursday 3

Hi, y’all! Anna and Miriam here with the third Throwback Thursday. Today we’re going to talk about a student play funded by the the Lutton Memorial Fund.   Jesse Paulsen, class of ’09, wrote and directed Service as his thesis production. The play included nine other students from varying class years and was performed in the Blackbox Theatre under the DC. Service, a mix of farce and melodrama, depicts a fictional student from Bryn Mawr School of Social Work by the name of Ramsay Kay as he researches criminal rehabilitation for his dissertation. Through his research into court-ordered community service, Ramsay finds trouble but also company. All five performances sold out completely. To find out more about the Lutton Memorial Fund, follow this link: www.haverford.edu/HHC/for_students/arts.php#Lutton   Have a good Thanksgiving, and we will be back the following Thursday! -Anna and...