HCAH interviews Charles Woodard on his solo-exhibition opening tonight!

HCAH interviews Charles Woodard on his solo-exhibition opening tonight!

Charles Woodard The History of Photography in Pen and Ink, 1646-1990 June 28 – August 5, 2016   Higher Pictures is pleased to present the work of Charles Woodard. The 60 four-by-six-inch flashcards on view here comprise the complete set of drawings Woodard made as an undergraduate in 2007 when he was a student in Nick Muellner’s notoriously difficult history of photography survey course at Ithaca College. This is the first time these original pieces have been shown and this is Woodard’s first solo gallery exhibition.     HCAH: Can you let us in on the history of how these works came to be? C. Woodard: The original drawings came to be due to a rather monstrous History of Photography course I took in undergrad coupled with a broken printer. Since I didn’t want to pay the printing charge at the library, I opted to draw the photos that I had to study out on flash cards, and used them. After the course was finished, I presented them to my professor at the time, since I knew he found them funny. A month later I got an email from him and his publishing partner, saying they wanted to turn the work into a book. HCAH: So, because of these note cards, you have your first solo-exhibition…but did they actually help you pass your exam? C. Woodard: Yes, they actually did help, which is why people like them I assume. I got an A in the class. HCAH: What was the card that you had the most fun drawing? Which image was the hardest to memorize? C. Woodard: My personal,...
Summer of Learning: Interning at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Summer of Learning: Interning at the University of Pennsylvania’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

  When I was in 9th grade, I visited the Penn Museum for the first time and it changed my life. It sparked my interest in Anthropology and a desire to one day work in a museum. The museum has a vast collection of objects, the amount unheard of for a University Museum. 6 years later and I’m now interning at the museum in two separate departments: the Learning Programs Department whose main focus is the K-12 audience, and the Public Programs Department who focuses on the general population. Both are two separate entities but both focus on public engagement and teaching, 2 pillars of the museum’s mission statement. I knew I wanted to work somewhere in museum education in the future, so being able to intern in both departments was a perfect fit! In the Learning Programs Department, I work under Kevin Schott, the Guide Programs Manager, and Allyson Mitchell, the Outreach Programs Manager both of which who are so great and amazing. Kevin is the person I go to whenever I’m confused, 10/10 times he has had answers for me. The department has several other people who are all museum educators and work on different aspects in the department. I am so grateful to be able to work alongside them since they are some of the nicest and most welcoming people I have ever met! The first day of work, over 400 kids came into the museum, all around the same time, and it was the most organized chaos I have ever seen. Everyone in the department was calm and handled all of the hyper kids with ease...

Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery Opening: Other People’s Property

Photo by Matthew Callinan What meaning can be found in the image of an appropriated image of an Absolut Vodka advertisement where the familiar image of the glass bottle shares the shape of an African slave ship? I went to the opening of Hank Willis Thomas’s Other People’s Property at the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery out of curiosity – perhaps looking for answers to my questions. Is there even a relevant, meaningful connection? Is he just trying to be provocative? I was there for over an hour – an hour during which probably a hundred or so students, faculty and guests listened to Kalia Brooks (the curator) and Thomas introduce themselves and address the pieces in the exhibit – some students asked questions, others, like me, listened. Before I walked in, I grabbed a catalogue and read an essay written by Brooks addressing the exhibit and the larger body of Thomas’s work. Standing in front of the piece titled Scarred Chest I wondered why this man’s chest was emblazoned with the famous Nike swoosh I see on my soccer cleats and running shorts. I looked to Brooks for guidance: “Thomas interrogates the idea of the spectacle both by acknowledging the power of the image as it relates to the visualization (or lack thereof) of the black body and by using those images to subvert misleading narratives of race, class and gender that are embedded in history and contemporary culture.” In interrogating the spectacle as Brooks says it, gazing at an image can paradoxically entail both critique and participation—Thomas supposedly does the former. But I never put that much thought into...