An Interdisciplinary Lab

An Interdisciplinary Lab

I have spent the last couple weeks at Carleton College in Northfield, MN. Along with 5 other students, I have been part of a humanities lab exploring classical mythology through maps using digital tools called Omeka and Neatline. First we found artifacts and entered them into a database with Omeka. We then made Neatline maps incorporating many of these images and exploring the lives of specific heroes (I worked on Herakles, also known as Hercules). I have taken many classics courses, but I’m a computer science major and have focused on math and computer science for most of my time in college. When I arrived at this program, I felt a little out of place. What’s a computer science major doing at a humanities lab? Everybody was excited about the opportunity to work on a hands-on project, because in the humanities that opportunity doesn’t come up very often. I was pretty open to whatever our time together would bring, and I didn’t necessarily know what I was expecting to get out of the experience. One of the things I have really appreciated about this lab is the potential for people from very different backgrounds to learn something. My favorite part of our project was working on the technological side: thinking about user interface and map design. However, we also learned how to search for ancient artifacts in art databases and wrote up exhibits exploring interesting things about our heroes. Everybody had their own preferences about different phases of the process. There was little background knowledge expected coming in, which made collaborating much easier. We were all starting from scratch on our...
The Art of Connecting Artifacts and Maps

The Art of Connecting Artifacts and Maps

Kristine Mallinson, Denison University Class of 2015 When I first heard about the 2014 Alliance for the Advancement of Liberal Arts Colleges Humanities Lab at Carleton, I was not exactly sure what the program was going to be like. I knew that  there was going to be a group of students from different liberal arts schools examining Classical mythology in different ways. One group was going to be focusing on masks and the other on maps. I was particularly interested in the mapping mythology program. To my delight, I was accepted into that program. So, on Sunday August 10th I arrived in Minnesota for the first time excited to get started and learn more about what we would be doing. The first morning we discussed Euripides Heracles and different aspects about the play. Then we split into our different groups. In my group, Dr. Bryan Burns (our director) taught us how to use several different databases and explained that we would be using Omeka and Neatline. Now, I have never used these two programs and one should know that I am pretty bad with technology, however he said that they were simple programs. Omeka is the artifact database, or at least that is how I like to think about it. Working at the Denison Museum during the school year and interning at the Toledo Museum of Art for a couple weeks this summer provided me with a good amount of experience working with different databases and  artifacts. I  was immediately interested and fascinated with the idea of using artifacts on a digital map to examine literary accounts. I have decided...

Call for 2-Minute Presentations // SAVE AS: Lightning Talks 2

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQDDqv1tQkk&feature=youtu.be ATTN: Hackers, Designers, Luddites, Emoticon-Artists, YouTube Hooligans, Blogger Oddities, Ambient Electronic Muzak-Makers, Faculty, Students, Staff, and all manner of Digital/Non-Digital/Post-Digital Scholars In the fall of 2012 in Magill Library’s Philips Wing, 20-something students, staff, and faculty gathered together for the first SAVE AS: Lightning Talks event, each presenting digitally-minded 2-minute micro-presentations on animation in a digital world, tumblr and intellectual property rights, the help and hindrance of online religious text databases, and yes, even a brain-melting meta-lesson on how to give a good presentation in two minutes. See the full list of presentations here. Amid the hastened shouts of presenters and the polite murmuring of the packed audience, one thing was clear: We have to do this again. To that end, the SAVE AS cabal (an unholy alliance of Digital Scholarship in the Library, Instructional & Information Technology Services, the Hurford Center of the Arts & Humanities, and Tri-Co Digital Humanities) invites you to pitch a 2-minute presentation on your own digital scholarship, the germ of an idea, an app, a game, digital notation, twitter etiquette, something you’ve done, something you want to do. Share past successes or use your dwindling soapbox to source future collaborators. Essentially: Anything that uses, abuses, accepts or rejects digital technology in a way you find interesting. Intrigued? Email Coordinator for Digital Scholarship Laurie Allen at lallen@haverford.edu with a one-sentence description of your idea, and we’ll go from there. Once we reach a critical mass, we’ll announce the spring 2013 date of SAVE AS: Lightning Talks Round...