One Little Piggy Did Marketing

Hey world, The production process for PAY UP is well under way. We got a receipt for $3,000 worth of lumber yesterday, which means that the set is probably being constructed as I type. Funnily enough, the PAY UP set looks quite minimalist (in the press release, I call it “stark and labyrinthine”) but is also incredibly complicated. If you’ve seen any of our social media pages, you’ve seen Anna Kiraly (the set designer)’s axonometric box drawings* that I’ve turned into banners and icons; those give a good idea of the simplicity of the set, very black, white, and geometric. However, in person the set doesn’t feel simple at all. It is incredibly complex and complicatedly immense, as is the whole production. If (when?) you see it, you’ll understand what I mean. It’s impossible to see the same show twice, even if you take the map handed out at the door. But despite the above opinions, I really am not involved in the production process of PAY UP at all. In fact, most of my days have been spent in the office working on development and marketing. We have a number of special events for PITC donors and sponsors in the weeks leading up to PAY UP, so I’ve been writing the invites for those and updating our database of PITC supporters. I’ve been doing some graphic design work for the various mailings we’ve been sending out, which I’ve really enjoyed. My recent project has been to manage the visa application process for a New Zealand composer who is coming over to work on Pig Iron’s TWELFTH NIGHT in...

And Pig Iron Came Tumbling After

Hey world, I’ve been waiting for this to be unclassified: my much-anticipated PAY UP 2013 tumblr has finally gone public: payup2013.tumblr.com I mentioned last time that I’ve been doing publicity and social media for this fall’s production of PAY UP, an interactive market place of a show that touches on value, commerce, capuchin monkeys etc.  Well, this tumblr is a repository for all media PAY UP related, be it academic, pop-culture, or theatrical.  I’ve amassed a huge quantity of content so far and am working on assembling it into themed units, or collections of posts.  This week, it’s all about capuchin monkeys and Justin Bieber.  Next week, we’re gonna make it rain ($$).  So far, this has been a very nerdy and rewarding experience, a chance to explore the corners of a fascinating show and a gigantic internet.  There’s a link for submissions under the tumblr’s heading–if you have any ideas for future content, please let me know!  At two posts a day, there are going to be hundreds of posts by the time the show is over.  Feedback is always welcome. This week, I’ve also spent a lot of time coordinating Pig Iron’s various social media accounts (@pigirontheatre and Facebook), focusing on promoting the tumblr and the ramping up of the PAY UP production process.  I am really not a social media maven (I don’t use Facebook and can’t really figure out LinkedIn), so this has been a new, and probably very marketable, skill for me.  Surprisingly, I like it a lot–it’s really interesting to see which posts attract the most attention and how I can alter our...

Living the Pig Iron Life

Hey world, My name is Alice Thatcher and I’m a super-senior working at Pig Iron Theatre Company in Kensington, Philadelphia. As is the life of an intern, I’ll be working on several different projects this summer, including grant writing, social media and research for Pig Iron’s fall line-up. I’ve been hired particularly to focus on Pig Iron’s restaging of Pay Up, a Pig Iron original which premiered in 2005. Pay Up is based on the work of economist and behavioral psychologist Dr. Keith Chen, current Associate Professor at Yale School of Management. Dr. Chen’s 2006 study on the behavior of capuchin monkeys trained to conduct basic economic transactions found that capuchins exhibit many of the same behaviors we do, implying that these behaviors are innate rather than taught or learned. Pay Up takes this laboratory set-up and invites audience members to choose and pay for the scenes of their choosing, using dollar bills handed out in the beginning of the show. There isn’t enough time, money, or space for audience members to see every scene, which places the audience in a competitive market environment where there are real consequences to their actions. Pay Up is currently be reworked to take into account current events and the input of the new acting ensemble (the show was last staged in 2008), but it’s shaping up to be an exciting, creative summer here. Working with John Frisbee, Managing Director of Pig Iron and HC ’03, I’m in the midst of assembling a grant to bring Dr. Chen down for a weekend matinee of Pay Up and a discussion section afterwards. Dr. Chen...