Fresco Workshop with Mariel Capanna

Fresco Workshop with Mariel Capanna

Julia Coletti ’21 describes attending VCAM Artist in Residence Mariel Capanna’s fresco painting workshop. The students mixed the plaster, cured it on canvases, and painted their own fresco murals over the course of the afternoon.

Inventions en Pointe

Inventions en Pointe

Rehearsals for this collaborative pointework piece with choreographer and alum Antonia Brown are winding down as we prepare for our showing of the new piece on Tuesday, May 5th at 2 p.m. in Pembroke Studio at Bryn Mawr College! Inventions en Pointe brings together two Haverford students and one Haverford alumna in a collaborative choreographic process that seeks to explore the physical boundaries of pointe work and create a duet in four short weeks. The centerpiece of the project involves collaborating with local artist Antonia Z Brown, Class of ’13, an Artist in Residence at Mascher Space Cooperative in Philadelphia. Antonia was a 2012 recipient of the San Francisco Conservatory of Dance Choreographic Residency and was a featured artist in the 2014 Philadelphia Fringe Festival. Choreographically she is using this project to delve into the contemporary possibilities of ballet en pointe, pushing boundaries of form and motion in movement. The duet is being choreographed on two Haverford students, Aurora Jensen, Class of 2015, and Emma Cohen, Class of 2017. Our interest in the project stemmed from our drive to take an analytical eye to the limitations of our classical ballet backgrounds and discover our originality and physical capabilities. Classical ballet, particularly en pointe, is rooted in a long tradition of strict rules that require tremendous control, strength and skill to carry out. These are the very rules we intended to challenge. For instance, ballet emphasizes balance, symmetry and posture. Instead we wondered what would happen to pointework if we introduce falling, twisting, and inversion? Another norm in ballet is to build choreography entirely out of a library of classical steps. We...
Portraiture, Disability, and Identity: Explorations with Mellon Creative Resident Riva Lehrer

Portraiture, Disability, and Identity: Explorations with Mellon Creative Resident Riva Lehrer

Mellon Creative Resident Riva Lehrer is returning to Haverford this Thursday to deliver her lecture, “Jarred: Self-Portrait in Formaldehyde”, inspired by an encounter with a fetal specimen at the mutter museum. Riva has exhibited her work in museums and galleries across the country, and has also curated numerous exhibitions. Her work focuses on issues of physical identity and the socially challenged body. Riva’s visit is a continuation of her work with Professor Kristin Lindgren’s course “Disability, Identity, Culture,” part of the 360° Program, “Identity Matters.” The cluster of three courses focuses on representations of illness and disability in the arts. Over fall break, Riva Lehrer and students in the 360 spent five days at Camphill Village, an intentional community in Kimberton, PA that includes adults with developmental disabilities. During the trip, students created textual and visual portraits of Camphill residents. I spoke with student Sula Malina, BMC ‘17, about the class’ trip to Camphill Village and Riva Lehrer’s residency. Can you tell me a little bit about the structure of the Camphill Village visit? We visited Camphill for five days, from a Sunday to a Thursday, so we could get a glimpse of the most active days of the week for the villagers. Each of us were paired with a villager who had volunteered to take part in the experience, and we were meant to follow them around, either shadowing or helping out, with their various activities throughout the day. We stayed at a nearby camp, ate our breakfast there each morning, and then drove over to Camphill. We also worked with our villagers and Riva on drawing, and followed...