Meet Courtney Carter ’17, HCAH Postbac Fellow!

Meet Courtney Carter ’17, HCAH Postbac Fellow!

Courtney Carter ’17 joined the HCAH staff this summer as the new Postbaccalaureate Fellow.   What is the role of the Hurford Center postbac position? The Post Baccalaureate Fellowship incorporates a lot of different aspects of the Hurford Center’s mission, so I will be working with the faculty and staff at the Center and beyond to have a part in planning and executing the programs and events this year. My main responsibility is helping with the exhibition and student programs, especially in the VCAM’s three Create Spaces. I look forward to collaborating with the HCAH Student Advisory Board and connecting with other students that might want to partner with the Hurford Center. What drew you to the position? As a student at Haverford, the Hurford Center’s opportunities in arts, leadership, and exhibitions provided me with the tools to find and pursue my career path. I would love to be a part of that opportunity for other students here as well. Since you’re coming into the position as an alum, can you talk a little bit about your time at Haverford? I really enjoyed my time at Haverford, and am glad to be back. I was an English major, and if VCAM had been around, it would have been my second home. I was very involved, per the usual Haverford student. I played varsity lacrosse, served on the Body Text editorial board, co-founded Haverminds, was a Custom’s Person, and worked as gallery assistant in the Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery. For me as a student, Haverford was a place where I could make my own path, my own mistakes, and develop into the kind...
Dance of the Dead: A Lot

Dance of the Dead: A Lot

Chris Gandolfo-Lucia ’19 reflects on his work as a student research assistant to HCAH Visual Media Scholar Professor John Muse. Dance of the Dead: A Lot Day 1: Professor John Muse  has shown me some pictures. Well… quite a few pictures. Through the Google Drive™, he has shared with me a file of photographs called “Edited Best Delaware Picts 2012-2013.” These pictures shared a simple, sometimes haunting theme: they captured roadside memorials in Delaware, erected by friends, family, or the state to mark the site where someone died in an automobile accident. He wants to put these pictures on a map. He wants me to help him. Day 13: The project is called Imperfect City, Imperfect State and it’s helping professor Muse explore the nameless, indistinct swaths of land that have been passed over by the logic of common address systems — the sides of highways, sharp bends on country roads, a median in a busy intersection… the sorts of places people die in car accidents. This makes the mapping of these photographs a peculiar task, since most user-friendly mapping programs suffer from some nasty flaws: some automatically relocate users’ mapped photos, locking them to predetermined landmarks (Google Maps™) while others simply don’t offer the user enough control over how their images are displayed and who can see them (Flickr™). Some, however, suffer from the most egregious flaw of all — they simply don’t exist anymore (Panaramio™). So you could say I’m in a bit of a pickle [laugh track]. Day 26: My goodness… We’ve figured it out. We plan to  use a program called Neatline, which will give...