Tonight @ the Greenline: Readings by Emma Eisenberg & Thomas Devaney

TONIGHT, Tuesday 11/20 at 7:00 p.m., visiting Professor of English and poet Thomas Devaney and alum poet/fiction writer Emma Eisenberg read their words at the Greenline Cafe in West Philly (45th and Locust). Thomas Devaney is a poet, critic, and Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Haverford College. He is the author of A Series of Small Boxes (Fish Drum, 2007), Letters to Ernesto Neto ( Germ Folios, 2005), and The American Pragmatist Fell in Love (Banshee Press, 1999). He was the editor of The Art of the Box Lunch (Van Pelt Books, 2009) and is the editor ONandOnScreen poems + videos, a website exploring the intersection of words and images. His poems have been published in The American Poetry Review, jubliat, FENCE, Jacket, and online at PennSound. Anthologies include A Best of FENCE: The First Nine Years (FENCE Books, 2009), POEM: Poets On (an) Exchange Mission (Fish Drum/Double Change, 2009 bilingual French-English edition), Walt Whitman, Hom(m)age, 2005/1855 (Turtle Point Press and Editions Joca Seria, 2005) and American Poetry: The Next Generation (Carnegie Mellon 2000). His reviews and essays have been published in The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Jacket, The Boston Review, and Rain Taxi. Emma Eisenberg is a writer of poetry, fiction, essays, and music journalism. She is the author of Purple Heart Highway (Finishing Line Press, 2012). Her work has appeared in The Rumpus, VIDA, Full Stop, Poetry for the Masses, Philadelphia Weekly Paper, and The Hook and received awards from GlimmerTrain, Plain China, and West Virginia Writers Inc. Eisenberg received her B.A. in English and Gender and Sexuality Studies from Haverford College in Haverford,...

Gaming // Transmedia // Narrative // Cross-Platform

Submit a proposal for… RE:HUMANITIES 2013 A National Undergraduate Symposium on Digital Media Organized by students at Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Swarthmore Colleges, Re: Humanities is a two-day symposium featuring presentations by undergraduate scholars from across the country interested in the effects of digital media on academia. Exploring topics as diverse as digital archivalism, pop media, and the (re)tooling of textual analysis, the event seeks to develop a better understanding of of this emerging field by examining its influence on traditional scholarship as well as its potential for transforming academia. Watch this quick clip from last year’s Re:Humanities: ====================== Re:Humanities 2013: April 4-5, 2013 The Tri-Co Digital Humanities Student Working Group invites students to submit brief proposals (300-500 words) introducing your proposed presentation; topics might include, but are not limited to, interdisciplinary approaches to the following: Gaming and Narrative Transmedia Storytelling Infographics and Informatics Cultural criticism through the lens of new media platforms Digital forms of argumentation Visual models of record & witness Oral and auditory experimentations A multimodal scholar (or creator) “aims to produce work that reconfigures the relationships among author, reader, and technology while investigating the computer simultaneously as a platform, a medium, and a visualization device. ” —Tara McPherson, Associate Professor and Chair, School of Cinematic Arts, Critical Studies, University of Southern California; Re:Humanities 2013 Keynote Speaker[1] Taken together, these and related topics shape the contours of multimodal or transmedia storytelling and argument, constituting cross-platform approaches to course projects, digital scholarship, and student collaborations. Please contact us with any questions; we invite submission of criticism and projects at all stages of development, with the understanding that...

Call for 2-Minute Presentations // SAVE AS: Lightning Talks 2

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQDDqv1tQkk&feature=youtu.be ATTN: Hackers, Designers, Luddites, Emoticon-Artists, YouTube Hooligans, Blogger Oddities, Ambient Electronic Muzak-Makers, Faculty, Students, Staff, and all manner of Digital/Non-Digital/Post-Digital Scholars In the fall of 2012 in Magill Library’s Philips Wing, 20-something students, staff, and faculty gathered together for the first SAVE AS: Lightning Talks event, each presenting digitally-minded 2-minute micro-presentations on animation in a digital world, tumblr and intellectual property rights, the help and hindrance of online religious text databases, and yes, even a brain-melting meta-lesson on how to give a good presentation in two minutes. See the full list of presentations here. Amid the hastened shouts of presenters and the polite murmuring of the packed audience, one thing was clear: We have to do this again. To that end, the SAVE AS cabal (an unholy alliance of Digital Scholarship in the Library, Instructional & Information Technology Services, the Hurford Center of the Arts & Humanities, and Tri-Co Digital Humanities) invites you to pitch a 2-minute presentation on your own digital scholarship, the germ of an idea, an app, a game, digital notation, twitter etiquette, something you’ve done, something you want to do. Share past successes or use your dwindling soapbox to source future collaborators. Essentially: Anything that uses, abuses, accepts or rejects digital technology in a way you find interesting. Intrigued? Email Coordinator for Digital Scholarship Laurie Allen at lallen@haverford.edu with a one-sentence description of your idea, and we’ll go from there. Once we reach a critical mass, we’ll announce the spring 2013 date of SAVE AS: Lightning Talks Round...

From the Desk of Beth Willman /// SAVING HUBBLE

This Thursday inaugurates the Hurford Center’s new Fall 2012 Tuttle Film Series “Re-Envisioning Film Across the Disciplines,” featuring three films and conversations organized by faculty from the Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, and Humanities.  The series’ first film is Saving Hubble (2012, 70mins), directed by David Gaynes, who will be joining us for the screening at 7:00 p.m. in Stokes Auditorium, as well as for a public observing (weather permitting) at 8:45pm after the post-film discussion.  Also along for the ride is Dr. Nitya Kallivayalil (YCAA Prize Fellow, Yale Center for Astronomy & Astrophysics).  The event’s organizer and host is Assistant Professor of Astronomy Beth Willman, who explains how it all fits together: I’m excited to host this film at Haverford, for the ways it will impact my Astronomical Ideas class and for the opportunity that it brings to connect with the community outside of our class – inside and outside Haverford.  Both director David Gaynes and astronomer Nitya Kallivayalil (Yale) will host a post-film discussion.  I’m thrilled that some local amateur astronomers will also be joining us for the screening, with a few bringing their own telescopes for sky (and moon) viewing after the event if skies are clear. Dr. Kallivayalil’s participation in the screening will enrich our discussion about this film, thanks to her unique expertise in using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to measure the orbits of the Magellanic Clouds.  The day after the screening, both director Gaynes and Dr. Kallivayalil will visit Astronomical Ideas to tell the students (and some of their parents!) more about their work and to answer questions.  To complement this event, we...