CCPA Summer Series 2018: Puentes de Salud/Prevention Point

CCPA Summer Series 2018: Puentes de Salud/Prevention Point

Structurally Holistic Healthcare in Philadelphia          By Kelsey Smith I had the privilege of working in two different clinics this summer through the Primary Care Pre-Medical Internship provided by Dr. Steven Jaharis. Heading into the summer, my goal was to further inform my interest in structurally holistic healthcare for those who are left out of the American healthcare system through on-site, hands-on experiences in two clinics that serve different populations and focus on different health issues. Throughout my time at Haverford thus far, I have learned that health care is a great domain for social justice, but wanted to spend this summer seeing how that type of ideology is put into action. I split my time between Puentes de Salud, a clinic that promotes the health and wellness of the growing Latinx immigrant population in South Philadelphia, and Prevention Point, an organization that promotes the health, empowerment, and safety for communities affected by drug use and poverty. As a pre-medical student interested in Global and Community Health, it has been such an amazing experience to work in a hands-on capacity with people who have dedicated their lives to careers similar to ones that I hope to pursue. Puentes de Salud uses a comprehensive healthcare model that includes medicine, education, and community support services to serve the growing undocumented Latinx population of South Philadelphia. Their two part mission focuses on addressing the immediate medical needs of the Latinx population while also creating a successful learning environment that helps future teachers, doctors, and other advocates understand the importance of identifying structural violence and it’s impact on the health of individuals. On the...
CCPA Summer Series 2018: Medico Family Clinic

CCPA Summer Series 2018: Medico Family Clinic

By Sheraz Qamar Over the past nine weeks, I have learned a great deal about what it is like to be a healthcare provider for under-served and minority populations, especially those without health insurance. Many patients that come to the clinic are self-paying; for this reason, the doctor is always looking for ways to assist patients financially by providing coupons for pharmacies and giving free samples of expensive medication. He is always looking for the best and cheapest options for his patients. During the end of the first month, the doctor told me that the clinic usually sees less patients at the end of each month due to the fact that many patients have to pay rent at that time and are unable to spend money on healthcare services. As I typed notes for the doctor and assisted with billing procedures, I was also able to learn about the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes needed for billing purposes. Each assessment, such as hyperlipidemia, joint pain, and even regular physical exams, has an ICD code that is needed in order to get paid from insurance companies. This was the first time that I had been introduced to ICD codes and how they are used in a clinical setting. Based on each assessment, the doctor also ordered blood work, therapeutic injections, or other tests that were done in another room at the clinic. The lab room was where blood samples are collected and sent to LabCorp, who conduct an analysis and send the results back to the clinic. This was very convenient for patients as they were able to get...
CCPA Summer Blog 2018: Kansas City CARE

CCPA Summer Blog 2018: Kansas City CARE

By Jake Kwon ’19 During the warm summer days out in Kansas City, I have been working atKansas City CARE Health Center, a primary care clinic with three locations near downtown that provides patient-centered care to underserved populations in the area. This clinic was founded in 1971 to provide CARE (Care, Access, Research, and Education) for everyone, regardless of insurance or ability to pay. By working at Kansas City CARE, I was eager to grasp what it meant to administer primary care directly to individuals that have little to no access to adequate healthcare, especially in my residential community. So far for seven weeks, I have been working at different locations of the clinic as a scribe and medical assistant on Mondays and Tuesdays, scribe for another physician on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and a referrals assistant on Fridays. It’s a lot. In fact, during the first two weeks of the internship, I was at first overwhelmed by the variety of tasks and the number of responsibilities to be learned. However, I became more excited at the same time because I knew that this schedule would give me something new to look forward to each day and provide a more comprehensive understanding what clinical work entails. I am scribing for Dr. Joel Feder and Dr. Marijen S. Aga, who have been administering family and psychiatric care, respectively, to their patients. During each physician-patient encounter, I take notes of what is discussed regarding symptoms, diagnoses, medications, and plans, and then chart them into the EHR (Electronic Health Record). By working alongside with the physicians during every encounter, I have been able...
CCPA Summer Series 2018: How “Service-Learning” Abroad Prepared me for my Summer Internship

CCPA Summer Series 2018: How “Service-Learning” Abroad Prepared me for my Summer Internship

By Dayana Davila This summer I will be interning at Penn Medicine as a clinical research assistant in a primary care setting with Dr. Carmen Guerra. Though I do not begin until July 9th, over the past semester, spring 2018, I participated in CIEE’s service-learning program through which I was able to gain valuable experience that I will apply during my summer internship. As part of this service-learning program, I was placed at Victoria Hospital, a public hospital, in order to complete the “service” aspect of my program. Though the purpose of my “service” at Victoria was to complete a research-based project, the first two weeks were dedicated to shadowing and immersing myself into the culture at Victoria Hospital. As a pre-med student, I was beyond eager for the opportunity to shadow alongside doctors and medical students as they went along their daily duties. It is important to note that Victoria Hospital is a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Cape Town (UCT), meaning there is a constant flow of final-year medical students rotating in and out of each medical department as they finalize their clinical studies. This was of a great benefit to me because I was able to fit right in as an observer amongst all the medical students that went through the rounds each morning, although I was often confused for a medical student Every Tuesday and Thursday morning, I arrived to Victoria Hospital at 7:30 am for the beginning of the morning rounds, which usually ended around 11 am. On a typical morning at 7:30 am the consultant doctor, registrar doctors, and medical students...