Winter Break Planning for Pre-Health Students

Winter Break Planning for Pre-Health Students

Winter Break Planning for Pre-Health Students By Jodi Domsky As fall semester winds down, I wanted to share some information about winter break ideas for a variety of topics including spring semester, summer internships, gap year jobs for graduating seniors, and tasks you can work on if you are applying to med school or taking the MCAT this summer. Health-Related Opportunities for Spring Semester Winter break is a good time to look into setting up a clinical or research volunteer position/internship for spring semester if your schedule allows. This link will give you a helpful overview of how to get started. The Bryn Mawr College Civic Engagement Office (CEO) directory of health care volunteer opportunities in the Mainline and Philadelphia area.  In addition, our CPGC Office has an interactive map on their website that you may find useful. Summer Internships  Winter break is a good time to explore options for summer internships and volunteer opportunities. Sophomores and juniors can work on application materials for College Sponsored Internships. The internship that I manage is the Jaharis Summer Primary Care Internship Program.  To be eligible for the Jaharis internship you need to find your own site, and that may take a while. The application deadline is February 17, 2019.  Applications can be submitted even if you still have not confirmed the clinical setting by February 17. If you need more information on potential site liaisons please email Leslie Wood at lwood@haverford.edu. Other ideas are to explore hospital volunteer opportunities, EMT, phlebotomy or hospice training programs, and/or research opportunities near your home. Gap Year Jobs for Seniors There are several events in the spring coordinated by CCPA that you may find helpful in your job search. Register now for the Tri-College Recruiting Day and...
CCPA Summer Series 2018: Health Care Improvement Foundation (HCIF)

CCPA Summer Series 2018: Health Care Improvement Foundation (HCIF)

By Sarah Svetec This summer I am working in the role of a research/data analyst, which might not be the first thing you would think a pre-medicine student would pursue as a summer internship. My summer internship, sponsored by the Whitehead Internship Program, is at the Health Care Improvement Foundation. I sought out this opportunity because I wanted to broaden my perspective on health care in order to contribute to my efforts to hopefully become a well-rounded physician one day. The Health Care Improvement Foundation (HCIF) is a non-profit organization in Philadelphia that works to facilitate the collaboration of major health care stakeholders in order to improve the quality, transparency, consistency and affordability of health care. HCIF has two main branches, one focusing on population health and the other on clinical improvement. At HCIF I do most of my work with a Haverford alum, Bret Marlowe, who works with everything data-related on three main projects. I assist Bret as well as other team members with project design, data analysis, report writing, website development and event organization for these projects. The three projects I work on include the Pennsylvania Health Care Quality Alliance, which is an initiative of HCIF that brings together hospitals, physicians, and health plans to improve quality of care and publicly report health care performance, CPR Ready, a Philadelphia area campaign to increase bystander CPR and cardiac arrest survival rates, and finally, the Pennsylvania Urologic Regional Collaborative, a quality improvement initiative that brings urology practices together in a physician-led, data-sharing collaborative aimed at advancing the quality of diagnosis and care for men with prostate cancer. One of...
CCPA Summer Series 2018: Puentes de Salud/Prevention Point

CCPA Summer Series 2018: Puentes de Salud/Prevention Point

Structurally Holistic Healthcare in Philadelphia          By Kelsey Smith I had the privilege of working in two different clinics this summer through the Primary Care Pre-Medical Internship provided by Dr. Steven Jaharis. Heading into the summer, my goal was to further inform my interest in structurally holistic healthcare for those who are left out of the American healthcare system through on-site, hands-on experiences in two clinics that serve different populations and focus on different health issues. Throughout my time at Haverford thus far, I have learned that health care is a great domain for social justice, but wanted to spend this summer seeing how that type of ideology is put into action. I split my time between Puentes de Salud, a clinic that promotes the health and wellness of the growing Latinx immigrant population in South Philadelphia, and Prevention Point, an organization that promotes the health, empowerment, and safety for communities affected by drug use and poverty. As a pre-medical student interested in Global and Community Health, it has been such an amazing experience to work in a hands-on capacity with people who have dedicated their lives to careers similar to ones that I hope to pursue. Puentes de Salud uses a comprehensive healthcare model that includes medicine, education, and community support services to serve the growing undocumented Latinx population of South Philadelphia. Their two part mission focuses on addressing the immediate medical needs of the Latinx population while also creating a successful learning environment that helps future teachers, doctors, and other advocates understand the importance of identifying structural violence and it’s impact on the health of individuals. On the...
CCPA Summer Series 2018: Medico Family Clinic

CCPA Summer Series 2018: Medico Family Clinic

By Sheraz Qamar Over the past nine weeks, I have learned a great deal about what it is like to be a healthcare provider for under-served and minority populations, especially those without health insurance. Many patients that come to the clinic are self-paying; for this reason, the doctor is always looking for ways to assist patients financially by providing coupons for pharmacies and giving free samples of expensive medication. He is always looking for the best and cheapest options for his patients. During the end of the first month, the doctor told me that the clinic usually sees less patients at the end of each month due to the fact that many patients have to pay rent at that time and are unable to spend money on healthcare services. As I typed notes for the doctor and assisted with billing procedures, I was also able to learn about the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes needed for billing purposes. Each assessment, such as hyperlipidemia, joint pain, and even regular physical exams, has an ICD code that is needed in order to get paid from insurance companies. This was the first time that I had been introduced to ICD codes and how they are used in a clinical setting. Based on each assessment, the doctor also ordered blood work, therapeutic injections, or other tests that were done in another room at the clinic. The lab room was where blood samples are collected and sent to LabCorp, who conduct an analysis and send the results back to the clinic. This was very convenient for patients as they were able to get...
CCPA Summer Blog 2018: Kansas City CARE

CCPA Summer Blog 2018: Kansas City CARE

By Jake Kwon ’19 During the warm summer days out in Kansas City, I have been working atKansas City CARE Health Center, a primary care clinic with three locations near downtown that provides patient-centered care to underserved populations in the area. This clinic was founded in 1971 to provide CARE (Care, Access, Research, and Education) for everyone, regardless of insurance or ability to pay. By working at Kansas City CARE, I was eager to grasp what it meant to administer primary care directly to individuals that have little to no access to adequate healthcare, especially in my residential community. So far for seven weeks, I have been working at different locations of the clinic as a scribe and medical assistant on Mondays and Tuesdays, scribe for another physician on Wednesdays and Thursdays, and a referrals assistant on Fridays. It’s a lot. In fact, during the first two weeks of the internship, I was at first overwhelmed by the variety of tasks and the number of responsibilities to be learned. However, I became more excited at the same time because I knew that this schedule would give me something new to look forward to each day and provide a more comprehensive understanding what clinical work entails. I am scribing for Dr. Joel Feder and Dr. Marijen S. Aga, who have been administering family and psychiatric care, respectively, to their patients. During each physician-patient encounter, I take notes of what is discussed regarding symptoms, diagnoses, medications, and plans, and then chart them into the EHR (Electronic Health Record). By working alongside with the physicians during every encounter, I have been able...