From the Haverblog: 2019 Haverford House Fellows

From the Haverblog: 2019 Haverford House Fellows

Gabe Halperin-Goldstein ’19, Lilian Domenick ’19, Feven Gezahegn ’19, Ceci Silberstein ’19, Hanae Togami ’19, and Amanda Grolig ’19 will spend next year working at Philadelphia nonprofits and strengthening connections between the College and the city. The Center for Peace and Global Citizenship (CPGC) has named its 2019–2020 Haverford House Fellows. These six seniors, who were chosen for this fellowship for their commitment to social justice and community action, will spend the upcoming academic year after their College graduation working four days per week with nonprofit organizations in the Philadelphia region and sharing a house together in the West Philadelphia neighborhood of Cedar Park. The fellows, who serve as liaisons between the CPGC and local social action agencies, as well as collaborators with Haverford community members, dedicate their fifth workday to projects that engage the College with local groups devoted to creating a more socially just, healthy, and vibrant community. The 2019–2020 Haverford House Fellows and their host organizations are: Spanish major Lillian Domenick, who will work at Puentes de Salud‘s Hacia el Futuro Education Program Biology major Feven Gezahegn, who will work for African Family Health Organization (AFHO) Sociology major Amanda Grolig, who will work for Philadelphia Legal Assistance, Save Your Home Philly Sociology major Gabe Halperin-Goldstein, who will work for Drexel University’s Center for Hunger-Free Communities Environmental Studies and Mathematics double major Ceci Silberstein ’19, who will work for the Pennsylvania Horticulture Society Biology major Hanae Togami, who will work for HIAS PA Follow the current class of fellows, who are posting monthly about their work, house activities, and independent projects that connect the Haverford College community with Philadelphia. Read more about Fords who have won fellowships, scholarships, or grants. Originally published by Rebecca Raber, Director...
Benefits of a Gap Year After College or High School

Benefits of a Gap Year After College or High School

Benefits of a Gap Year After College or High School An Alternative for New High School and College Graduate   Reposted from The Balance Careers | BY PENNY LORETTO | Updated December 11, 2018 | Original Article Here As graduation approaches and many students have not found a job and are not interested in immediately going to grad school, some have considered taking a gap year when school ends. People are finding that a gap year affords them the time to spread their wings and find out what they really want to do with their future. In the past, it was believed that getting a job or going immediately on to graduate school were the only options. But with many more choices available and in a slow economy, taking a gap year after college can be a worthwhile—and economical—experience.   Who Should Consider Taking a Year Away From Studies Of course, there are students who already know what they want to do and have known for quite a long period of time. Some students are so determined and aware of their future aspirations early on while others are still sorting things out throughout their college years and beyond. The important thing is that everyone is different and some people may make their decisions early, while others take a little longer in the decision-making process.   How Taking a Gap Year May Help A gap year experience can truly be a time to get to know yourself better. Trying new things and meeting new people can be enlightening and a positive experience where you can also take time to reflect on your personal strengths, interests, and skills that...
Fords on Friday: Richard Lyon ’68 on taking a Gap Year

Fords on Friday: Richard Lyon ’68 on taking a Gap Year

Richard G. Lyon ’68  Taking a Gap Year Before Law School   For some reason I’m frequently asked by prospective students about applying to law school. I say “for some reason” because it was almost fifty years ago when I did so, and everyone knows (and the questioners know better than anyone) that the law as a profession and the calculus of law school have changed enormously in the past half century. Particularly the economics.   Maybe I’m asked because grey hair is supposed to make me wise. Maybe it’s that I always say that I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my career in Big Law. Whatever the reason I’m flattered. My answer is much different than what I considered in 1968 and its principal focus is on the dollars.   The economics of law school – $180,000 + living expenses. Like all education, law school tuition has risen far ahead of ordinary inflation. Law school is now a very substantial investment, and that on top of the cost of that college degree. Most kids even with parental support cannot pay out of pocket as they go. The obvious and often only alternative is a loan, resulting for many in a law degree encumbered with a substantial mortgage. And the benefit side of the equation has changed even more. The value of access to a license in a licensed profession that should pay off in increased earning power is far more uncertain than in my day. The growth of law schools, rising legal fees, a recognition that a lawyer isn’t always necessary, among many other factors have left many newly-minted lawyers without an...