A Message From Haverford’s Media, Entertainment, and Sports Affinity Group Committee

A Message From Haverford’s Media, Entertainment, and Sports Affinity Group Committee

The Haverford alumni community includes a number of affinity groups, organizations which offer connections around topics and issues of shared interest. Our affinity group, the Media, Entertainment, and Sports Group, is comprised of Haverford alums that work across the spectrum of the Entertainment/Media Industry. Professional Sports, Content Creation, Corporate Strategy, and Talent Representation are just a few of the many subsections of the industry represented by your alums. You may not be thinking about it yet, but the time to take the next step in your career will arrive faster than you think. Whether you’re a first-year student looking to learn more about career paths, a sophomore considering internships, or a senior looking to burnish your resume, we want to be there for you when it’s time to start considering life after Haverford. We’re reaching out because we want to help position you for success. In our conversations as a group, we’ve acknowledged how Haverford students often aren’t aware of careers in our discipline(s). This is something we want to correct, because not only are we all happy with the paths we’ve chosen, but the Media, Entertainment, and Sports space(s) are perfectly suited for an individual with a liberal arts background to thrive in. We’ve listed our professional backgrounds and our contact information below. We want you to reach us out to us–whether it’s concerning your impending graduation, or just to touch base and get a conversation going, we’d love to hear from you.   Sincerely yours,   Zachary Jacobs ’14 Coordinator, Motion Picture Production, ICM Partners Los Angeles, CA Zachary Jacobs ’14 began his career at ICM Partners...
Coming Up: Conversations with Alumni Leaders

Coming Up: Conversations with Alumni Leaders

This Saturday, February 9th, the Alumni Association Executive Committee (AAEC) will be meeting on Haverford’s Campus. They have set aside time to meet with current Haverford students in the Bryn Mawr Room of the Dining Center from 4:30-5:30 pm. During this event, all students are encouraged to come and meet the members of Haverford’s AAEC! This is an excellent opportunity for both students who are brand new to networking and those who have lots of experience. These alumni are excited to share career insights, connect about life at Haverford, give advice about life after Haverford, and get to know current students! The list and bios of potential attendees can be found at hav.to/aaec . Please register here by Thursday, Feb. 7.  Registered students will receive a confirmation email with the event details. *Dress Code: Business...
CCPA Summer Series 2017: Claire Burdick ‘19 at Conservators Center in Burlington, NC

CCPA Summer Series 2017: Claire Burdick ‘19 at Conservators Center in Burlington, NC

This summer, I was an animal husbandry intern at the Conservators Center in Burlington, NC. The Conservators’ Center is a nonprofit that houses over 80 animals of 21 different species. A few of my favorite species were tigers, lions, New Guinea singing dogs, dingoes, and leopards. I applied for this internship because I have a passion for working with animals and I am very interested in animal behavior and cognition. Through my experience working with lemurs, bears, and other smaller species, I have found that working closely with animals and getting to know them as individuals is a great way to learn about behavior and cognition, and I am very happy that I got to work with big cats this summer!   This slideshow requires JavaScript. At the Center, each day started out with diet preparation, and each animal has different requirements about what types of meat, whole prey, fruit, and/or animal biscuits they can eat and what types of medications they need in their food. During diet prep, I learned a lot about what goes into caring for big cats throughout the different stages of their lives. After we finished, we headed into the park to feed all of the animals, clean their enclosures, and place enrichment for each animal. Enrichment is my favorite part of working with animals, as its purpose is to improve the lives of captive animals by stimulating them mentally and/or physically or encouraging them to engage in natural behaviors. For example, I gave the leopards, lynxes, wolves, and coyote cardboard boxes with shredded newspaper inside with a scent on it to give them...
CCPA Summer Series: Alexandra Bernas ‘19 HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy in Philadelphia, PA

CCPA Summer Series: Alexandra Bernas ‘19 HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy in Philadelphia, PA

Alexandra Bernas ‘19 HMS School for Children with Cerebral Palsy Philadelphia, PA   “Hello, band!” My supervisor Brad greets his students at Home of our Merciful Savior (HMS) School for Children with Cerebral Palsy. “Today we will play When The Saints Go Marching In, with Eddie as our conductor.” Eddie looks at the word “start” on his screen so his eye-gaze recognition device can say his chosen word. At that moment, Brad sings and plays his guitar. I improvise a basic keyboard accompaniment. The rest of the class plays tambourines, switchboards, drums, electric keyboards, chimes, and any instrument they could access from their wheelchairs. While playing, we all listen for Eddie’s cues to stop, play faster, or slow down.   Giving and responding to cues is natural in relationships between professional conductors and musical ensembles. However, for people with cerebral palsy, congenital brain damage prevents them from doing basic human activities such as walking, feeding oneself, and speaking. During my time assisting Brad and providing keyboard accompaniment at HMS, I learned that the location and extent of brain damage affects one’s ability to drive a wheelchair, chew food, and make micromovements that devices translate into spoken word.   HMS uses a variety of expressive arts therapies such as music to enhance cognitive and physical abilities in children with brain damage. In the conducting exercise, I witnessed principles I learned in Professor Boltz’s Foundations of Psychology. Through classical conditioning, the group associates each command word with the starting, stopping, or tempo change in the music. And through conformity, the students perceive and follow each other’s change in music-making behavior to maintain...