Announcing: CCPA Peer Career Advising

Announcing: CCPA Peer Career Advising

NEW: CCPA Peer Career Advising Starting this fall, the CCPA will be hosting Peer Career Advising Hours! These sessions will be run by the office’s Advising Intern, Alex Venturini ’21. Alex will be able to assist students of all class years with Handshake, Haverford Connect, on-the-spot resume reviews, and the navigation of CCPA resources. Advising Hours – Fall 2019: CCPA (Stokes 300): Mondays, October 7-December 9, 10:00-11:00 AM Lutnick Library 225: Wednesdays, October 23-December 11, 7:30-8:30 PM Except for November 27th Dining Center Foyer: Tuesday, October 8, 5:30 – 7:00 PM Friday, October 25, 12:15 – 1:45 PM Tuesday, October 29, 5:30 – 7:00 PM Friday, November 8,  12:15 – 1:45 PM   This slideshow requires...
Weekly Events: April 15-21

Weekly Events: April 15-21

Walk-in Advising Schedule (15 min drop-in appointments, 2:30-4:30 p.m) Mon- Jennifer Barr Tues- Mike Hertel Weds- Laura Reiter +Bonus Walk-in Hours (3-4:30) for Fulbright Fellowship Questions with Amy Feifer Thurs- Amy Feifer Fri- Amanda Dennis Events Tuesday, April 16 NYU Steinhardt Teacher Residency Information Session 9:00 p.m., Online, see link above. Wednesday, April 17 Interviewing from the Employer’s Perspective 6:30 p.m., Dorothy Vernon Room – New Dorm, BMC Thursday, April 18 J.P Morgan Chase- HR Virtual Office Hours 12:00 p.m., Online, see link above. Campus to Careers for Students with Disabilities 2:00 p.m., Online, see link above. CCPA Intern Preparation: Expectations and Etiquette 6:00 p.m., Faculty Dining Room, DC Elite Scholars of China (ESC) Virtual Information Session 8:00, p.m., Online, see link...
5 Tips for Nailing a Phone Screen – By Vault

5 Tips for Nailing a Phone Screen – By Vault

by Kaitlin McManus | March 19, 2019 | Reposted from Vault | Original Article Including Any Updates I’m a millennial, and I hate talking on the phone. In other news, the sky is blue. It’s not that I’m afraid of talking on the phone—I do it. I just don’t like it. And I don’t like it because I find there’s a disconnect. In an email, you’ve got pretty much all the time in the world to get your point across, use the right words, and strike the right tone. And in person, you can read a person’s expressions and body language to get a sense of how the conversation is going, which is ideal in an interview scenario. A phone call has none of that—both you and your conversation partner are just disembodied voices. The phone screen or phone interview is often the first hurdle that you need to clear in getting a job but, because you can’t really see how a person is responding to your conversation, it adds another layer of removal from the situation and thus another level of anxiety. Here, I’ll get into some ways you can set yourself up for success during a phone screen. 1. Housekeeping No, don’t clean your house. (Although, in a Skype interview, you’ll probably want to do that—or at least the space directly behind you.) I just mean make sure you take care of all the nuts and bolts. Find a quiet space to take the call (i.e., kick your roommates or your kids out of the room), charge your phone, and make sure you’ve taken it off “Do Not Disturb” mode from the movies last...
How to Determine What Salary You Deserve

How to Determine What Salary You Deserve

Article reposted from Career Contessa. See the original post and any updates here. Career Contessa is a resource designed for women looking to build their careers, however, their advice on how to determine a starting salary is applicable to all Haverford Students. The CCPA encourages you to explore their website for more advice. Please note that the CCPA is in no way affiliated with Career Contessa nor do we receive any compensation for promoting their content.    How to Determine What Salary You Deserve BY KATHERINE NOBLES | December 10, 2018   At some point in your career, the question of salary expectations is bound to come up. While you should always try to avoid naming a number first, the fact of the matter is: at some point, you will have to provide an answer. But determining what that number should be is not always an easy task. Like most women, you were probably taught to avoid discussing money with family and friends, let alone potential employers. The key to alleviating tension (and getting what you deserve) is to prepare your response and tactics in advance. Here we’ve broken it out into three steps to help you come to an educated conclusion of exactly what you’re worth. STEP 1: ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES AND RESEARCH The best place to begin is by thinking big picture. Before you consider your own merits, research the “going rate” for the positions you’re aiming for.   Online salary calculators are a simplified, yet effective way to do this. But you should also review the salary ranges of others in comparable roles or at similar organizations by using The Salary Project™, Glassdoor.com, Payscale.com, or Salary.com. The Bureau of Labor...
Choosing and Using Your Major

Choosing and Using Your Major

By Alex Venturini ’21 The process of choosing a major is fraught with difficult choices, all of which feel monumentally important: your major shapes not only the next two years of college life, but also, seemingly, your career prospects for the rest of your working life. Questions you may now be asking yourself include: Do I choose something practical, or something I love doing? Whose opinions should I take into consideration: my parents, my friends, my family, my dean, my professors..? Which department(s) do I prefer? What can I see myself doing in the future, and which major(s) will help me in doing that? As the April 19th deadline for declaring a major approaches, it is important to think seriously about this significant decision. Read on to dispel some myths surrounding undergraduate majors and to find valuable resources available to Haverford students.   What is the most practical major? In his New York Times article “Choosing a Practical Major”, Dean of Academic Affairs Phil Bean examines traditional advice to major in something ‘practical.’ He gives the following advice: Any definition of the practical that fails to take into account an individual’s interests, demonstrable aptitude, or current state of personal development will tend to undermine the ability to get the most out of college. Rather than choosing a major based on prestige or perceived financial pay-off, it is important to choose a major that aligns with your interests. Dean Bean highlights how doing well in your classes, which comes easier with interest, ultimately represents “the ability to identify, define, research and offer well-composed analyses for complex problems.” These are useful skills...