SLAC February Video Interview Day: How to Apply and What to Expect

SLAC February Video Interview Day: How to Apply and What to Expect

Participating with SLAC gives you access to off-campus job interviews with leading employers around the country!    The Selective Liberal Arts Consortium provides students with off-campus interview opportunities for post-graduate and internship positions with top employers in many different fields. The organizations that interview through SLAC come from all sectors, including for-profit, nonprofit, and government, and opportunities include entry-level jobs and internships in a wide range of areas, such as: Education Advertising Marketing Political organizing Technology Economic research Consulting Public policy Law Medical & scientific research About SLAC Events We offer 4 recruiting events: two Video Interview Days and two city-based Recruiting Days- in Washington, D.C. and New York. These events are ideal for seniors seeking entry-level jobs, or juniors seeking internships. Each event provides interviews with reputable employers, all in one day. For both the city-based events and the video interview days, students review and apply for opportunities through our online recruiting system. Employers then extend invitations to the applicants they wish to interview, and students schedule their interviews online. City-Based Recruiting Days Our Washington, DC Recruiting Day and New York Recruiting Day are both held in January. Candidates selected for interviews arrange their own travel and accommodations. Recruiting Days provide an opportunity to participate in pre-selected face-to-face interviews. Video Interview Days Video Interview Days enable both employers and students to connect without having to travel off-campus or off-site. These events take place in September and February, and interviews are coordinated through each school’s career center using Zoom or other online service. February Video Interview Day 2020 Timeline Application Deadline: February 2, 2020 Employer Selections: February 3-6, 2020 Primary Selectees...
5 Tips for Nailing a Phone Screen – By Vault

5 Tips for Nailing a Phone Screen – By Vault

by Kaitlin McManus | March 19, 2019 | Reposted from Vault | Original Article Including Any Updates I’m a millennial, and I hate talking on the phone. In other news, the sky is blue. It’s not that I’m afraid of talking on the phone—I do it. I just don’t like it. And I don’t like it because I find there’s a disconnect. In an email, you’ve got pretty much all the time in the world to get your point across, use the right words, and strike the right tone. And in person, you can read a person’s expressions and body language to get a sense of how the conversation is going, which is ideal in an interview scenario. A phone call has none of that—both you and your conversation partner are just disembodied voices. The phone screen or phone interview is often the first hurdle that you need to clear in getting a job but, because you can’t really see how a person is responding to your conversation, it adds another layer of removal from the situation and thus another level of anxiety. Here, I’ll get into some ways you can set yourself up for success during a phone screen. 1. Housekeeping No, don’t clean your house. (Although, in a Skype interview, you’ll probably want to do that—or at least the space directly behind you.) I just mean make sure you take care of all the nuts and bolts. Find a quiet space to take the call (i.e., kick your roommates or your kids out of the room), charge your phone, and make sure you’ve taken it off “Do Not Disturb” mode from the movies last...
7 Professional Etiquette Rules to Live By

7 Professional Etiquette Rules to Live By

Professional etiquette is the unwritten code of conduct people are expected to follow in the workplace and at professional events. As a Haverford student, you likely already follow most, if not all of these just by adhering to the Honor Code. However, it never hurts to brush up to make sure you’re making good impressions. Here are seven rules that should live by in any professional setting:   1. Be on time. You know the phrase “If you’re early, you’re on time, if you’re on time, you’re late”? Follow it! Havertime doesn’t apply anywhere besides in class on campus.           2. Dress appropriately. Just because nobody explicitly told you to show up dressed professionally, doesn’t mean you should come in sweats and flip-flops. If you are going to work or a professional event, even those on campus, you should do your best to dress appropriately. It shows that you care. If you don’t have professional clothes, contact the CCPA and we can help you find something temporary from our Career Closet or direct you towards where you can find inexpensive permanent items.   3. Keep personal and professional separate. Don’t use your work computer, email, calendar, and/or other accounts for personal activities. When you’re at work, you should be doing work-related activities. The same goes for office conversation. It is fine to be open and talk about yourself in the workplace, but be careful not to overshare!             4. Be professional and positive on social media. Never post negative content about an employer, manager, or colleague online, even if you have a private account. There...
How to Determine What Salary You Deserve

How to Determine What Salary You Deserve

Article reposted from Career Contessa. See the original post and any updates here. Career Contessa is a resource designed for women looking to build their careers, however, their advice on how to determine a starting salary is applicable to all Haverford Students. The CCPA encourages you to explore their website for more advice. Please note that the CCPA is in no way affiliated with Career Contessa nor do we receive any compensation for promoting their content.    How to Determine What Salary You Deserve BY KATHERINE NOBLES | December 10, 2018   At some point in your career, the question of salary expectations is bound to come up. While you should always try to avoid naming a number first, the fact of the matter is: at some point, you will have to provide an answer. But determining what that number should be is not always an easy task. Like most women, you were probably taught to avoid discussing money with family and friends, let alone potential employers. The key to alleviating tension (and getting what you deserve) is to prepare your response and tactics in advance. Here we’ve broken it out into three steps to help you come to an educated conclusion of exactly what you’re worth. STEP 1: ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES AND RESEARCH The best place to begin is by thinking big picture. Before you consider your own merits, research the “going rate” for the positions you’re aiming for.   Online salary calculators are a simplified, yet effective way to do this. But you should also review the salary ranges of others in comparable roles or at similar organizations by using The Salary Project™, Glassdoor.com, Payscale.com, or Salary.com. The Bureau of Labor...
Recapped: Tri-College & STEM Recruiting Day

Recapped: Tri-College & STEM Recruiting Day

What an event! Last Friday, the Career Offices of Haverford, Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore hosted a tremendous event in the field house: Tri-College and STEM Recruiting Day. Employers from STEM fields, non-profits, finance, education, and many other fields came to meet and hire Tri-Co students. Students arrived dressed in their best professional attire for morning registration and the career fair. After a brief orientation and an opportunity to take a professional headshot for their LinkedIn profiles, students reviewed the list of employers who had open interview spaces that afternoon. They then made their way to the career fair and chatted with employers to learn more about their companies. If they were interested in being considered for an interview later that day, they would share their resumes. The career fair wrapped up in the afternoon and employers submitted their picks to the career center staff during lunch. The remainder of the day was then dedicated to interviews! We had LOTS of students pick up additional interviews during the career fair, so the schedules were packed! All in all, the day was a great success! Happy employers and happy students make for happy career center staff! We hope to see you next year!...
Preparing for your Video Interview

Preparing for your Video Interview

Your next interview may not be face-to-face—it could be through Skype, Google Hangout, Facetime, or a webcam. According to one recent survey, 55 percent of employers have used video interviewing as a college recruiting tool and more and more employers are recognizing video as a useful interviewing tool. Getting ready for your video interview isn’t hard, but there are specific steps you can take to ensure you interview at your very best. The good news is: Everything you do for an in-person interview is needed for your video interview. Research the company. Practice answering potential questions. Have a list of questions you would like to ask. Dress professionally for the interview. Write a thank-you note after the interview. Here’s how to turn a regular interview into your video interview: Check first with your university’s career center. It may be set up for video interviews. Plus, staff there can help you practice—and practice is key to a successful interview. If you are doing the video interview on your own, be sure to practice. If you are handling the video interview on your own, choose the device you’re most comfortable using. You can use your computer, a tablet, or your smart phone. Test your equipment well in advance of the interview. On the day of the interview, make sure the battery is at full power and the camera lens is clean. Check your Internet connection. If you share a connection, you may want to ask others to stay off the Internet while you are interviewing. Be sure to check your connection an hour before the interview to ensure everything is working....