Haverford College Class of 2018 Watson Fellows (and this year’s info session!)

Haverford College Class of 2018 Watson Fellows (and this year’s info session!)

Photo: 2018 Watson Fellows Owen Janson (in a mushroom hat) and Tosin Alliyu. Photo by Patrick Montero.  In honor of our Watson Fellowship Info Session tonight, we are sharing this post from last March announcing the 2018 Watson Fellows from Haverford College, Tosin Alliyu and Owen Janson. If you are interested in learning more about this opportunity, please join us tonight, Dec. 5, at 7 pm in the Faculty Room of the DC, immediately following the Whitehead Info Session at 6 pm!   Two Seniors Earn Watson Fellowships By Rebecca Raber  |  March 29, 2018  |  Original Post Here   Tosin Alliyu and Owen Janson will spend next year traveling the world in pursuit of independent research projects cultivated on an international scale thanks to $30,000 awards. Two members of the Class of 2018, Tosin Alliyu and Owen Janson, have been awarded Thomas J. Watson Fellowships, which fund a year of independent exploration and international travel for newly graduated college students. Alliyu and Janson are among the 40 awardees in the 50th class of Watson Fellows selected from a highly competitive pool of 152 national finalists. Watson Fellows come from 40 private liberal arts colleges and universities and receive $30,000 to subsidize an independent project undertaken during 12 months of travel outside the United States. Alliyu, a computer science major with a concentration in peace, justice, and human rights, will spend next year traveling to Singapore, Spain, South Africa, and Dubai for her project, “Design and Human-Centered Products Across Cultures.” This project was inspired by her time studying abroad in South Korea, where they are building “smart cities”—urban areas that use different types of electronic data collection...

How to Ace a Technical Interview

Thank you to Assistant Professor of Computer Science Sorelle Friedler for the second of several posts on aspects of life after Haverford! Getting an interview: Apply everywhere – they can’t say yes if you don’t. If you know people (e.g., alums) working somewhere you want to work, send them your resume and ask them to submit it.  Tell them specifically what job you’re looking for (e.g., software engineering internship).  This is not necessarily an inconvenience for them!  Many companies pay employees who referred you (a lot) if you’re hired! If you want a full-time job, it’s VERY helpful if you’ve done an internship.  Try to do one! Before: Read “Programming Interviews Exposed” (available in the Science Library) or some similar book and work through every single example. Know your basics: Take CS 106 and CS 340 and / or go back and practice what you learned there, paying special attention to linked lists, hash tables, dynamic programming, and big-Oh notation.  (Some interviewers’ favorites.) Know the company: look at what they’re working on.  Think about what you would do differently. Whiteboard coding: practice writing code on a whiteboard and talking through a solution out loud to a friend.  It’s harder than it looks to make it neat and understandable! During: Don’t be a jerk.  No one wants to work with you if you are. Think out loud: a large part of what they’re testing is your thought process.  If you come up with solutions and discard them, say that!  Say why! Pay attention to the details: they want to know if you see the corner cases. Ask for help: the interviewer...

Fords on Friday: Tips for Writing a Software Engineering Resume

Thank you to Haverford College Assistant Professor of Computer Science Sorelle Friedler for the first of several posts on aspects of life after Haverford! Follow all of the usual steps for writing a good resume.  (See CCPA.) Ignore the advice from #1 that your resume needs to fit on one page, but only if you really have things to say that will allow you to take it onto a second page. Make sure you have a clear objective at the top that especially says what type of job you’re looking for and if it’s an internship or full-time job, and gives a flavor of what type of work you’re especially interested in.  E.g.: Objective: Obtain a full-time job as a software engineer working to use social networks for advertising. Make sure your last section is called “Skills” and lists the programming languages you know.  Your resume may be read by a computer, so you need to make sure it has all the right keywords.  If you know frameworks (e.g., Django), you should also list those.  So the section might look like: Skills Programming Languages: Python, Java, HTML, Javascript Frameworks: Django, CSS, Ajax If you have awards, these should be in their own section and should have clear descriptive language that explains the size / prestige of the award and what it’s for.  This makes clear just how selective the award is.  For example: Pretend Computer Science Department Award: a monetary award given to the graduating senior at Haverford College who shows “the most promise in software engineering.” Awesome National Award: a full scholarship given to 3 “outstanding undergraduate computer...