New Raised Beds, Saving Seeds, and Potted Veggies.

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These dressers were found in the facilities dumpster. The one above will serve as a mini green house for lettuce and other low growing plants come winter.

 

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Experimenting with various potted vegetables including carrots, broccoli, and peppers.

 

 

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Letting lettuce go to seed.

 

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The arugula is also going to seed. And seeding mustard leaf is pictured below.

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I placed the female spinach plants in bags where the seeds will dry out and then fall into the bag.

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The Farm Behind 22

Free for the picking, this community garden will produce

tomatoes now till early august
cabbage in a couple weeks
peppers in august

and some corn, mustard leaves, herbs,

as well as squash and pumpkins come fall

 

 

The farm is largely maintained by Carousel Connections, a camp living in apartment 22 for most of the summer. This is their website: www.carouselconnections.com/

Organic Insecticide

I applied an insecticide made of hot pepper, natural soap, garlic, lemon peel, and water to a variety of plants that were being damaged by aphids and other pests. However, a week later, there is no difference between the control and treatment group. I think the problem is that the aphids need to be sprayed directly, and when I sprayed the plants, there may not have actually been any bugs on them at the time. Going forward, if I spot a colony of aphids, I will be sure to attack.

Philabundance

The other day, Stu Hean and I traveled to Philabundance, the region’s largest food bank. We dropped off about four pounds of broccoli and cauliflower leaves (a one-ounce serving provides 90 percent of your daily vitamin A requirement according to oprah.com). The remaining broccoli and cauliflower plants in the garden will be used for their vegetable rather than their leaf.

Philabundance collects food through individuals, grocery stores (who can give away food that is about to expire even though it is safe to eat), and gleaning (which is taking the leftover crops from farms after the farmer is done harvesting). In all, Philabundance feeds over 60,000 people per year!.

Providing for the Dining Center

A couple weeks ago I had a meeting with Bernie Chung-Templeton (Bi-Co Director of Dining Services), Anthony Condo (Associate Director of Dining Services), and Dan McCorkle (Production Manager) to discuss the Dining Center buying food from the garden. It was agreed upon that the DC would buy food from the garden year round at low prices. Shortly afterwards, Richard Wynn (Vice President for Finance) explained that the DC can not accept uninsured food. So, unless the Garden Club decides to buy insurance, the DC will not be purchasing from the garden. On the plus side, this means more food for the pantries.

Harvest

101_3809      Dan Feller was construction manager of this noble sign.

 

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Radishes have all been harvested now.

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Three varieties of perennial mint grew back on their own.

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Enjoy our delicious lettuce which has a few more weeks left.

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Spinach has been doing well, but big leaves are being bitten by bugs.

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Kale will grow bigger, but is ready for harvest if your hungry.

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Arugula was our strongest growing crop outside of mint. Careful of its strong taste now that it has begun flowering.