Monthly Archives: September 2013

Stream bank restoration

arranging boulders hungry goats

Bethany Simmonds and Zoe McAlear both Class of 2016, work with horticulturist, Charlie Jenkins

Bethany Simmonds and Zoe McAlear both Class of 2016, work with horticulturist, Charlie Jenkins

This summer, folks who frequent the nature trail noticed a lot of activity.  The arboretum hired an engineering firm, LandConcepts to stabilize the stream bank.  Priorities for the work included, erosion remediation, the establishment of heavy stream flow boundaries, and revegetating disturbed sections with native plants.  This project was sandwiched between the dredging of the upper pond back in the fall of 2012.  The upper pond serves as the first line of defense, primarily as a sediment pond.  Over the years of build up, this pond routinely overflowed its banks pouring large amounts of sediment into the Duck Pond.  When large rain events occurred the Duck Pond and stream outflow could not handle the heavy volume of discharge.  Consequently, resulting in the stream’s banks to erode jeopardizing the safety of the nature trail.  The mini-spectacle of the EcoGoats to chew there way through adjacent stream edges overrun with exotic invasive species was quite an attraction for the summer visitors, staff and neighbors.

When the heavy work of placing boulders and moving earth was complete,the engineering firm came on to the site with 500 native plants.  these included oaks, tulip trees sycamores and many other shrubs, all at the time of planting were no larger than 2ft tall.  These will seamlessly blend in to the existing mature plant material as the years progress.  Last week we added a few dozen ferns that were removed from an area on campus to the stream’s edge.